What parents should know….???
WHAT IS A PEDIATRIC DENTIST?
A pediatric dentist is someone who has completed three additional years of post-doctoral training, beyond the general dentistry degree, in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric dental disease. This training includes special education in child psychology and behavior management, preventive dentistry, advanced restorative dentistry, conscious sedation, hospital dentistry and the treatment of the medically and physically compromised child. The pediatric dentist's extensive study of physical growth and development is also applied to the interception and treatment of orthodontic problems. The pediatric dentist is the only specialist who is committed to the comprehensive oral health care of children from infancy through the teen-age years. Because of this specialized training, the pediatric dentist is best qualified to meet the needs of infants, children and teenagers by providing different approaches in dealing with their behavior, guiding their dental growth and development, managing their dental treatment needs, and helping them avoid future dental problems. Just as parents choose a pediatrician for their child's medical needs, many parents wisely choose a pediatric dentist for their child's dental needs. We are having Dr.Sharan Sargod to think best for your kids.
 
INFANT ORAL HEALTH CARE (BIRTH TO TWO YEARS)
The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that an initial oral evaluation visit should occur within six months of the eruption of the first primary tooth and no later than twelve months of age. During this important visit we will complete a thorough medical and dental history, complete a thorough oral examination, assess your child's risk of developing oral and dental disease, and determine an appropriate interval for periodic reevaluation.
 
 
  PREPARING YOUR CHILD (TWO YEARS AND ABOVE)
We encourage you to prepare your child for a visit to the pediatric dentist before the first appointment. For young children, excellent books that describe a visit to the dentist can be found at the library and in bookstores. Discuss the positive aspects of dentistry with your child. Convey good feelings about the dental visit as being a part of growing up. Let your child know they are going to learn lots of new ways to make their teeth sparkle and enjoy a healthy smile.
 
Morning appointments are recommended for little ones when they are refreshed and more accepting of new experiences. If you expect your child to react well, chances are very good your child will enjoy the first visit to our office. In addition to preparing your child for the important first visit, please provide all information pertinent to your child's dental, medical and social situation on the health forms you will be given by our office. This will enable us to provide the best possible care for your child.
 
EARLY ORTHODONTICS
Occasionally, a child's facial and dental growth becomes disrupted as a result of genetics or early dental habits such as thumbsucking or mouthbreathing. Pediatric dentists are specialists in the area of growth and development of the face and teeth, and are ideally suited to intervene in these situations. Many times extensive orthodontic treatment may be averted through timely pediatric orthodontic care as the face, jaws, and teeth are developing.
 
PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY
We hope you share in our belief that regular oral health maintenance is a sound investment in your child's overall health. To maintain optimum oral health, we recommend that your child be seen every six months for a continuing care appointment that includes an oral examination, a cleaning, the application of fluoride, and any necessary radiographs (x-rays). Preventive care will help prevent tooth decay and periodontal disease.

At continuing care time you will be asked to update your child's dental, medical, and social history which may have changed since the last visit. We will examine and treat your child as we did at the first visit and discuss the findings with you.
 
Frequently Asked Questions
Q: At what age should I bring my child to the pediatric dentist?
Q: My two-year-old child has a cavity in a tooth. Should the tooth be filled?
Q: Will I go into the treatment room with my child?
Q: When will my baby start getting teeth?
Q: Is there anything I can do to comfort my baby while he is teething?
Q: Why do the permanent teeth look so much yellower than the baby teeth?
Q: My child has a double row of front teeth. Why this and what is should be done about it?
Q: Is it all right for my child to remove her own baby teeth when they become loose?
Q: What about the big space between my eight-year-old's two upper front teeth?
Q: My child's baby teeth had a lot of decay. Does this mean that the permanent will be just as bad?
Q: What causes nursing caries and baby bottle tooth decay?
Q: Why should the baby teeth be filled, since they will be lost anyway?
Q: When should I start cleaning my baby's teeth?
Q: Should I use an electric toothbrush on my child's teeth?
Q: What toothpaste is best for my child?
Q: Why is it necessary to take my child to the pediatric dentist every six months?
Q: What causes decay?
Q: Why is fluoride so important?
Q: Should I worry about thumb or finger sucking?
Q: What is a sealant?
Q: What instructions should I follow for my child after procedures?
 
Still have questions?
Ask us for more information.
 
Q: At what age should I bring my child to the pediatric dentist?
A: Children should have the first dental visit within six months of the eruption of the first baby tooth and no later than their first birthday. This is so that an assessment and record can be made of your child's dental development and risk of getting cavities. This also gives us the opportunity to discuss good oral hygiene practices at home, diet, injury prevention and possible need for fluoride supplements. If we find cavities or other problems, these things can be taken care of early before they become a bigger problem.
 
Q: My two-year-old child has a cavity in a tooth. Should the tooth be filled?
A: Yes, it should be treated as soon as possible to avoid pain and infection.
 
Q: Will I go into the treatment room with my child?
A: This depends on the pediatric dentist, the parent, the child and the situation. The decision on where the parent remains during the child's treatment should be made by the pediatric dentist and the parent, and is based on what is best for the child.
 
Q: When will my baby start getting teeth?
A: Usually the two lower front teeth (central incisors) erupt at about six months of age, followed shortly by the two upper central incisors. During the next 18 to 24 months, the rest of the baby teeth appear, although not in orderly sequence from front to back. All of these 20 primary teeth should be present at two to three years of age.
 
Q: Is there anything I can do to comfort my baby while he is teething?
A: Some children appear to be comforted during the normal eruption process by chewing on a teething biscuit, a piece of toast, or a frozen teething ring. Teething medications that can be rubbed on the gums to reduce the discomfort are available at your pharmacy.
 
Q: Why do the permanent teeth look so much yellower than the baby teeth?
A: Permanent teeth are normally yellower than primary teeth, but they appear even more so because you are comparing them with the lighter baby teeth still in the mouth.
 
Q: My child has a double row of front teeth. Why this and what is should be done about it?
A: This is not an uncommon occurrence. Sometimes the permanent teeth begin to come in before the baby teeth are lost. When this happens, unless the child can work the baby teeth out by himself within a few weeks, the pediatric dentist may have to remove them. Once the baby tooth is out, the tongue usually moves the permanent tooth forward into its proper position, if space permits. If this crowded condition should occur in the upper jaw, the baby teeth should be removed immediately. Sometimes it is necessary for the pediatric dentist to move the permanent tooth forward with an orthodontic appliance.
 
Q: Is it all right for my child to remove her own baby teeth when they become loose?
A: Perfectly all right. As the tooth loosens, it is natural for a child to assist the process, which may take several weeks.
 
Q: What about the big space between my eight-year-old's two upper front teeth?
A: Usually there is no need for concern. The space can be expected to close in the next few years as the other front teeth erupt. If there is a problem, your pediatric dentist will recognize it.
 
Q: My child's baby teeth had a lot of decay. Does this mean that the permanent will be just as bad?
A: Very probably, unless the cause can be determined and proper preventive and corrective steps are taken.
 
Q: What causes nursing caries and baby bottle tooth decay?
A: Though dairy products are considered one of the four basic food groups and an important part of the diet, in one specific situation milk can be responsible for causing a type of rampant decay. This decay process happens when a child goes to sleep while breast-feeding and bottle-feeding. The milk is collected on the roof of the mouth and tongue, and the upper front teeth are bathed in it. During sleep, the flow of saliva is reduced and the natural self-cleansing action of the mouth is diminished. The sugar content of the stagnant collected milk is changed to acids which cause decalcification (softening) of the enamel, resulting in extensive decay called "nursing caries".
 
Q: Why should the baby teeth be filled, since they will be lost anyway?
A: Even though these primary teeth are called "baby teeth", some of them must serve until the child is at least twelve years old, sometimes longer. Neglect of the baby teeth can result in pain, infection of the gums and jaws, impairment of general health, and premature loss of teeth, which is a major cause of orthodontic problems. Also, cavities tend to form in teeth that are next to other teeth with unfilled cavities, because decay is really an infection and will spread if left untreated. It is unwise to leave active decay in the mouth. Decay on baby teeth can cause decay on permanent teeth. Unfortunately, most children with untreated decay on baby teeth will develop decay on permanent teeth.
 
Q: When should I start cleaning my baby's teeth?
A: You should start cleaning your baby's teeth as soon as the teeth come in, because harmful plaque begins to form as soon as teeth erupt.
 
Q: Should I use an electric toothbrush on my child's teeth?
A: Some children, and some adults, seem to do a more effective job of cleaning the teeth with the aid of an electric toothbrush. It is often a matter of patient preference, and the novelty of the electric toothbrush may even motivate your child to brush more frequently. The pediatric dentist may suggest an electric toothbrush for some children.
 
Q: What toothpaste is best for my child?
A: A fluoridated toothpaste that is recognized by the American Dental Association, as being effective in reducing tooth decay should be used. Equally as important as the toothpaste is the thoroughness with which the plaque is removed by brushing and flossing. Children aged three years and younger should not use a fluoridated toothpaste; please select a non-fluoridated infant toothpaste.
 
Q: Why is it necessary to take my child to the pediatric dentist every six months?
A: The pediatric dentist will want to see your child at regular and frequent intervals for several reasons. Regular visits keep the child familiar with the pediatric dentist and his or her staff and encourage a pleasant, confident attitude in the child regarding this necessary, life long health practice. Also, as the child develops and grows, the pediatric dentist will want to be certain that tooth eruption and proper jaw development are progressing normally or, if not, that corrective measured are undertaken in time. Appropriate preventive measures such as regular applications of fluoride on the tooth surfaces, placement of pit and fissure sealants on newly erupted teeth, and reinforcement of good daily health practices (brushing, flossing, and dietary advice) can be continually encouraged by the pediatric dentist and his or her staff when the child is a regular and frequent visitor to the dental office. If decay or other dental defect has occurred, it will be detected in the early stages when it is easier and less costly to treat.
 
Q: What causes decay?
A: Decay is caused by dental plaque, a thin, sticky, colorless deposit of bacteria that constantly forms on everyone's teeth. When sugar is eaten, the bacteria in plaque produce acids that attack the tooth enamel. After repeated acid attacks, the enamel breaks down, and a cavity (hole) is formed.
 
Q: Why is fluoride so important?
A: Fluoride has been shown to dramatically decrease a person's chances of getting cavities by making teeth stronger. Fluoride in the drinking water is the best and easiest way to get it. Most major cities have fluoride in the drinking water system. In communities where the water district does not fluoridate the water, fluoride supplements should be given to your child until their twelve year molars are fully erupted (approximately age 12 years). Your pediatric dentist or pediatrician can help determine if your child needs fluoride supplements or not.
 
Q: Should I worry about thumb or finger sucking?
A: Thumbsucking is perfectly normal for infants; most children stop by age two. If your child does not stop thumbsucking, discourage it by age four. Prolonged thumbsucking can create crowded, crooked teeth and bite problems. Your pediatric dentist will be glad to suggest ways to address a prolonged thumbsucking habit.
 
Q : What is a sealant?
A: A sealant is a clear or shaded plastic material that is applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth (premolars and molars), where decay occurs most often. This sealant acts as a barrier, protecting the decay prone areas of the back teeth from plaque and acid.
 
Q: What instructions should I follow for my child after procedures?
A: the post op instruction is different for each procedure. You are suppose to follow the following instruction after the treatment of your kid.
 
Post - filling instructions
Care of the Mouth after Local Anesthetic
Your child has had local anesthetic for their dental procedure:
If the procedure was in the lower jaw... the tongue, teeth, lip and surrounding tissue will be numb or asleep.
If the procedure was in the upper jaw... the teeth, lip and surrounding tissue will be numb or asleep.
Often, children do not understand the effects of local anesthesia, and may chew, scratch, suck, or play with the numb lip, tongue, or cheek. These actions can cause minor irritations or they can be severe enough to cause swelling and abrasions to the tissue. Please monitor your child closely for approximately two hours following the appointment. It is wise to keep your child on a liquid or soft diet until the anesthetic has worn off.
Please do not hesitate to call the office if there are any questions.
 
Care of the Mouth after Trauma
Please keep the traumatized area as-clean-as possible. A soft wash cloth often works well during healing to aid the process.
If the swelling should re-occur, our office needs to see the patient as-soon-as possible. Ice should be administered during the first 24 hours to keep the swelling to a minimum.
 
Watch for infection (gum boils) in the area of trauma. If infection is noticed call the office so the patient can be seen as-soon-as possible.
Maintain a soft diet for two to three days, or until the child feels comfortable eating normally again.
Avoid sweets or foods that are extremely hot or cold.
If antibiotics or pain medicines are prescribed, be sure to follow the prescription as directed.
Please do not hesitate to call the office if there are any questions.
 
Care of the Mouth after Extractions
Do not scratch, chew, suck, or rub the lips, tongue, or cheek while they feel numb or asleep. The child should be watched closely so he/she does not injure his/her lip, tongue, or cheek before the anesthesia wears off.
 
Do not rinse the mouth for several hours.
Do not drink a carbonated beverage (Coke, Sprite, etc.) for the remainder of the day.
Keep fingers and tongue away from the extraction area.
Make sure to keep the area clean using soft brushing strokes with a toothbrush.
 
Bleeding - Some bleeding is to be expected. If unusual or sustained bleeding occurs, place cotton gauze firmly over the extraction area and bite down or hold in place for fifteen minutes. This can also be accomplished with a tea bag. Repeat if necessary.
Maintain a soft diet for a day or two, or until the child feels comfortable eating normally again.
Avoid strenuous exercise or physical activity for several hours after the extraction.
 
Pain - For discomfort use Children's painkiller as directed for the age of the child. If a medicine was prescribed, then follow the directions on the bottle.
Please do not hesitate to contact the office if there are any questions.
 
Care of Sealants
By forming a thin covering over the pits and fissures, sealants keep out plaque and food, thus decreasing the risk of decay. Since, the covering is only over the biting surface of the tooth, areas on the side and between teeth cannot be coated with the sealant. Good oral hygiene and nutrition are still very important in preventing decay next to these sealants or in areas unable to be covered.

Your child should refrain from eating ice or hard candy, which tend to fracture the sealant. Regular dental appointments are recommended in order for your child's dentist to be certain the sealants remain in place. The American Dental Association recognizes that sealants can play an important role in the prevention of tooth decay. When properly applied and maintained, they can successfully protect the chewing surfaces of your child's teeth. A total prevention program includes regular visits to the dentist, the use of fluoride, daily brushing and flossing, and limiting the number of times sugar-rich foods are eaten. If these measures are followed and sealants are used on the child's teeth, the risk of decay can be reduced or may even be eliminated!
 
Oral Discomfort after a Cleaning
A thorough cleaning unavoidably produces some bleeding and swelling and may cause some tenderness or discomfort. This is not due to a "rough cleaning" but, to tender and inflamed gums from insufficient oral hygiene. We recommend the following for 2-3 days after cleaning was performed:
A warm salt water rinse 2 - 3 times per day (1 teaspoon of salt in 1 cup of warm water)
For discomfort use Children's painkiller as directed for the age of the child.
 
Please do not hesitate to contact the office if the discomfort persists for more than 7 days or if there are any questions.
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